Blueberry Plum Balsamic Pie from Sister Pie - FOX 13 News

Blueberry Plum Balsamic Pie from Sister Pie

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This recipe comes courtesy of Lisa Ludwinski of Sister Pie.

CRUST
2 ½ cups unbleached, all purpose flour
1 cup (16 tbsp) unsalted butter, chilled and cut into chunks
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
½ cup ice water with a splash of apple cider vinegar

FILLING 1x
4-5 plums of assorted varieties, sliced
2 cups blueberries
¼ cup raw sugar
¼ cup light brown sugar
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
a few grinds of black pepper
pinch of salt
¼ cup tapioca starch

ASSEMBLY
1 tbsp cream cheese
raw sugar & white sugar
1 egg, beaten

1. Make the crust. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Using a pastry blender, cut in the butter until it resembles coarse meal. It's okay if the butter bits are different sizes, so long as none of them are larger than peas. At this point, add the ice water a tablespoon at a time and begin to gather the dough together. Turn the dough over itself a few times, but be careful not to overwork it. Pat the dough into two round disc and wrap in plastic to chill for a couple hours (or at least 30 minutes).

2. Make the blueberry plum filling. Combine the blueberries and plums in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, mix the sugars, balsamic, pepper, starch, and salt until it forms a paste. Pour this mixture over the fruit and toss to combine, making sure to coat each piece of fruit.

3. Roll out pie crust. Flour your work surface and place the unwrapped pie dough in the center. Using your favorite rolling pin (I prefer a French tapered pin, like this), press along the edges of the round, broadening the circle. You can move the disc around with your hand as you do this, making sure to flour the surface again when needed. Begin to flatten the pie dough into a larger circle by rolling from the center out. Roll, then rotate the disc and roll again. Don't forget to keep flouring the surface. You can flip the disc and repeat this process until you have a circle of even thickness, about 12 inches in diameter. Invert your pie tin or dish onto the circle, and use a pastry cutter (a knife works, too!) to trim the dough, leaving about a 1 inch border around the tin. Remove the pie tin and fold the dough in half. Place the folded dough into the pie tin and gently press it in, making sure it's centered and fitted properly, and let the extra dough hang over the side. Refrigerate while you roll out the lattice.

To rollout the lattice, start to roll the dough into a rectangle shape and then fold like a book. From there, roll the rectangle until it is approximately 12 inches wide and 9 inches tall. Cut strips of lattice about 1 inch wide.

Congratulations! The hardest part is over.

5. Assemble the pie. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees with a rack on the lowest level. Remove the rolled out pie crust from the refrigerator and use an offset spatula or spoon to spread an even layer of cream cheese on the bottom of the crust. Sprinkle with an equal mix of raw and white sugar. Fill the shell with fruit, and weave the lattice on top. To create a crimped edge: roll up the dough overhang towards the center of the pie, creating a ring of dough. Use the thumb and index finger of one hand to make a “V” and use the index finger of your other hand to press into the “V”, making a crimp. Continue until the entire ring of dough is crimped.

Brush the entire pie with an egg wash and sprinkle with more of that raw sugar mixture. Bake pie at 425 degrees for 15 minutes, then lower the temperature to 375 and bake for another 40-50 minutes, until the juices are bubbling all over. Cool the pie for at least 2 hours before slicing.



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