Game release restarts violent video game debate - FOX 13 News

Game release restarts violent video game debate

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TAMPA (FOX 13) -

Gamers had no problem waiting for hours to get their hands on the latest Grand Theft Auto game at midnight Tuesday. It's the 5th in the series. The game allows players to kill pedestrians, shoot at cops and celebrates a life of crime.

It's always been considered one of the most violent games on the market, and that's one of its biggest draws.

"The violence, the violence and the action," said Tiawon Norton

Sixteen-year-old Dartavious Garland picked up the mature rated game with his dad.

"They know that I'm a responsible young man," Garland said.

"Its a game that has violent graphics but if you look around in the world today there's violence all around us everywhere," Garland's dad said.

Still, Games like GTA 5 and Call of Duty are once again finding themselves at the center of controversy in the wake of a mass shooting. Friends of the D.C. Navy Yard shooter have said Aaron Alexis was obsessed with violent games.

The Newtown Connecticut shooter behind the sandy school massacre also played, and so did the Columbine kids. Experts say there is a pattern.

"There's definitely at least a correlation between violent video games and violent media and violent behavior," said Dr. Jeremy Gaise, a licensed psychologist.

Which is why he says parents should be aware of what goes on in these games and how it may affect their kids.

"There's a certain minority of people who are very vulnerable whether its violence in video games or abuse they experience," Dr. Gaise said.

Still some players say the games get a bad rap, after all they say, it is just a game.

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